July 24, 2017
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The Party Line

Spy thriller about the final days of Tehran American School.

Author: Lisa Alkofer/Saturday, October 25, 2014/Categories: Books, Iranian Revolution, Self-Promotion

The Party Line
Ok, here it is! Please buy, read, and spread the word to friends, family, and HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. Girl Power! My sister, Karen, did a great job. Enjoy Tehran.

love,
Lisa Alkofer
Set Decorator
Hope you are well. Based on true events, but a fantastic version of them!
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Summary of The Party Line by Karen Alkofer:

“Sharing a party line is like living in a small town: everyone knows your business and pretends they don’t know a thing.”

In 1977 Lizzie McCall is happily living a fairly typical teenage life, getting ready to start high school. Then her family is transferred to Tehran, Iran, an exotic country thousands of miles away from her American suburban life. This launches an adventure for Lizzie that will shape the rest of her life.

In the midst of making friends, going to class, and choosing the right boy to date, one of Lizzie’s favorite interests are the downstairs neighbors. Her family’s Tehran apartment shares a party line with them, and they are so intriguing that Lizzie makes a habit of listening in on their nighttime telephone conversations.

But she goes too far one night and gets sucked into a world far beyond her teenage awareness. Young Lizzie is about to become a key player in the Iranian Revolution, and with it will come challenges greater than she’s ever faced before.

About the Author, Karen Alkofer:

Karen Alkofer studied creative writing at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, where she currently resides. The Party Line, her debut novel, is inspired by her experiences living in Tehran, Iran, where her father, an American spy, and her mother, a secretary for the United States Embassy, were stationed in the late seventies.

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